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Peacock Poems

Table of Contents

  1. The peacock has a score of eyes by Christina Georgina Rossetti
  2. King Solomon and the Peacock by Ahmad Shawqi
  3. A Peacock Takes Its Perch by Endre Ady

  1. The peacock has a score of eyes

    by Christina Georgina Rossetti

    The peacock has a score of eyes,
    With which he cannot see;
    The cod-fish has a silent sound,
    However that may be;

    No dandelions tell the time,
    Although they turn to clocks;
    Cat's-cradle does not hold the cat,
    Nor foxglove fit the fox.

  2. King Solomon and the Peacock

    by Ahmad Shawqi

    I heard that once upon a time a peacock came to King Solomon,
    Heading a delegation of feathery folks.
    Ostensibly displaying its plumes, showing off its flashy garments.
    Alternately, revealing and concealing its bright feathers.
    He said to the King: I have a case I wish to present before you:
    I think it is time, your majesty, you looked into it.
    That's why, my Lord, I came here at your doorsteps.
    Am I not the meadows incarnate; with all their blossoms and sparkling lights?
    Haven't I gathered in my person every form of beauty, every shade and hue of color?
    Here I am, the Master of all birds at your door!
    Must I be left without what I most eagerly desire,
    When I am of noble lineage and decent descent?
    Alas, here I am, deprived of a melodious voice!
    I have never been able to enchant the hearts with my sweet tuneful strains,
    Nor entertain the ears with my songs.
    Behold, the littlest of birds is capable of inflaming the passions of lovers,
    Yea, even kings sway when a singing bird warbles, swaying on its branch.
    King Solomon answered, saying: Thus has it been ordained!
    Great is God's wisdom, wonderful are His handiwork.
    Indeed, you are self-conceited!
    Nor are you content with what God has created.
    You call yourself the king of birds, yet are lacking in wisdom and understanding.
    Well, dear peacock, had you a beautiful voice,
    You would be even haughtier,
    Moreover, you would not deign to talk to anyone

  3. A Peacock Takes Its Perch

    by Endre Ady

    'A peacock takes its perch upon the county hall —
    A sign that freedom comes to many folk in thrall.'

    Let the proud, frail peacock, whose feathers daze the sun,
    Proclaim that to-morrow here all will be undone.

    To-morrow all will change, be changed at last.
    New eyes In new battles will turn with laughter to the skies.

    New winds will make laments in the old Magyar trees,
    While we await, await new Magyar mysteries.

    Either we all are fools, and to a man shall die,
    Or else this faith of ours will prove it does not lie.

    New forges and new fires, new faiths, new holy men,
    Either you’ll come to life, or be nothing again.

    Either the ancient hall will fall from the flame’s stroke,
    Or our souls will sit here, bound in the ancient yoke.

    Either in Magyar words new meanings will unfold,
    Or the sad Magyar life will linger as of old.

    'A peacock takes its perch upon the county hall —
    A sign that freedom comes to many folk in thrall.'