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Poems About Strength

Table of Contents

Strength

  1. Endeavor by Anonymous
  2. Buttercups and Daisies by Mary Howitt
  3. Power by Emily Dickinson
  4. Peace by Bliss Carman
  5. My Burden by Anonymous
  6. To a Young Man by Edgar A. Guest
  7. Be Strong by Maltbie Davenport Babcock
  8. The Swedish Wife by Henrietta Gould Rowe

Health

  1. Health by Anonymous
  2. Health and Wealth by Anonymous

    Strength

  1. Endeavor

    You will never know your strength
    Without a test;
    Just by Better Street at length
    One reaches Best.

    - Anonymous
    Endeavor
    by Anonymous

    "If at first you don't succeed,
    Try try again,"—
    That's a manly sort of creed
    For boys and men.

    Trying doesn't cost a cent,
    May win a prize;
    Men that mope in discontent
    Will never rise.

    There is magic in a try,
    Vigor and vim;
    He that trusts in "by and by,"
    Look out for him!

    You will never know your strength
    Without a test;
    Just by Better Street at length
    One reaches Best.

  2. Buttercups and Daisies

    He who gave them hardships
    And a life of care,
    Gave them likewise hardy strength
    And patient hearts to bear.

    - Mary Howitt
    Buttercups and Daisies
    by Mary Howitt

    Buttercups and daisies,
    Oh, the pretty flowers;
    Coming ere the spring time,
    To tell of sunny hours,
    While the trees are leafless,
    While the fields are bare,
    Buttercups and daisies
    Spring up here and there.

    Ere the snow-drop peepeth,
    Ere the crocus bold,
    Ere the early primrose
    Opes its paly gold,—
    Somewhere on the sunny bank
    Buttercups are bright;
    Somewhere midst the frozen grass
    Peeps the daisy white.

    Little hardy flowers,
    Like to children poor,
    Playing in their sturdy health
    By their mother's door.
    Purple with the north-wind,
    Yet alert and bold;
    Fearing not, and caring not,
    Though they be a-cold!

    What to them is winter!
    What are stormy showers!
    Buttercups and daisies
    Are these human flowers!
    He who gave them hardships
    And a life of care,
    Gave them likewise hardy strength
    And patient hearts to bear.

  3. Power

    by Emily Dickinson

    You cannot put a fire out;
    A thing that can ignite
    Can go, itself, without a fan
    Upon the slowest night.

    You cannot fold a flood
    And put it in a drawer, —
    Because the winds would find it out,
    And tell your cedar floor.

  4. Peace

    "Who gives his heart to love,
    And holding truth for guide,
    Girds him with fearless strength,
    That freedom may abide."

    - Bliss Carman
    Peace
    by Bliss Carman

    The sleeping tarn is dark
    Below the wooded hill.
    Save for its homing sounds,
    The twilit world grows still.

    And I am left to muse
    In grave-eyed mystery,
    And watch the stars come out
    As sandalled dusk goes by.

    And now the light is gone,
    The drowsy murmurs cease,
    And through the still unknown
    I wonder whence comes peace.

    Then softly falls the word
    Of one beyond a name,
    "Peace only comes to him
    Who guards his life from shame, —

    "Who gives his heart to love,
    And holding truth for guide,
    Girds him with fearless strength,
    That freedom may abide."

  5. My Burden

    by Amos Russel Wells

    God laid upon my back a grievous load,
    A heavy cross to bear along the road.

    I staggered on, and lo! one weary day,
    An angry lion sprang across my way.

    I prayed to God, and swift at His command
    The cross became a weapon in my hand.

    It slew my raging enemy, and then
    Became a cross upon my back again.

    I faltered many a league, until at length,
    Groaning, I fell, and had no further strength.

    "O God," I cried, "I am so weak aud lame!"
    Then straight my cross a winged staff became.

    It swept me on till I regained the loss,
    Then leaped upon my back, again a cross.

    I reached a desert. O'er the burning track
    I persevered, the cross upon my back.

    No shade was there, and in the cruel sun
    I sank at last, and thought my days were done.

    But lo! the Lord works many a blest surprise—
    The cross became a tree before my eyes!

    I slept; I woke, to feel the strength of ten.
    I found the cross upon my back again.

    And thus through all my days, from that to this,
    The cross, my burden has become my bliss

    Nor ever shall I lay the burden down,
    For God some day will make the cross a crown!

  6. To a Young Man

    by Edgar A. Guest

    The great were once as you.
    They whom men magnify to-day
    Once groped and blundered on life's way,
    Were fearful of themselves, and thought
    By magic was men's greatness wrought.
    They feared to try what they could do;
    Yet Fame hath crowned with her success
    The selfsame gifts that you possess.

    The great were young as you,
    Dreaming the very dreams you hold,
    Longing yet fearing to be bold,
    Doubting that they themselves possessed
    The strength and skill for every test,
    Uncertain of the truths they knew,
    Not sure that they could stand to fate
    With all the courage of the great.

    Then came a day when they
    Their first bold venture made,
    Scorning to cry for aid.
    They dared to stand to fight alone,
    Took up the gauntlet life had thrown,
    Charged full-front to the fray,
    Mastered their fear of self, and then,
    Learned that our great men are but men.

  7. Be Strong

    by Maltbie Davenport Babcock

    Be strong!
    We are not here to play, to dream, to drift,
    We have hard work to do, and loads to lift.
    Shun not the struggle; face it. 'Tis God's gift.

    Be strong!
    Say not the days are evil, — Who's to blame?
    And fold not the hands and acquiesce, — O shame!
    Stand up, speak out, and bravely, in God's name.

    Be strong!
    It matters not how deep entrenched the wrong,
    How hard the battle goes, the day, how long.
    Faint not, fight on! To-morrow comes the song.


    Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might.

    – Ephesians 6:10
    The Bible, KJV
  8. The Swedish Wife

    by Henrietta Gould Rowe. In the State House at Augusta, Me., is a bunch of cedar shingles made by a Swedish woman the wife of one of the earliest settlers of New Sweden, who, with her husband sick and a family of little ones dependent upon her, made with her own hands these shingles, and carried them eight miles upon her back to the town of Caribou, where she exchanged them for provisions for her family.

    The morning sun shines bright and clear,
    Clear and cold, for winter is near,—
    Winter, the chill and dread:
    And the fire burns bright in the exile's home,
    With fagot of fir from the mountain's dome,
    While the children clamor for bread.

    Against the wall stands the idle wheel,
    Unfinished the thread upon the spindle and reel,
    The empty cards are crost;
    But nigh to the hearthstone sits the wife,
    With cleaver and mallet,—so brave and so blithe,
    She fears not famine or frost.

    Fair and soft are her braided locks,
    And the light in her blue eye merrily mocks
    The shadow of want and fear,
    As deftly, with fingers supple and strong,
    She draws the glittering shave along,
    O'er the slab of cedar near.

    Neatly and close are the shingles laid,
    Bound in a bunch,—then, undismayed,
    The Swedish wife uprose:
    "Be patient, my darlings," she blithely said,
    "I go to the town, and you shall have bread,
    Ere the day has reached its close."

    Eight miles she trudged—'twas a weary way;
    The road was rough, the sky grew gray
    With the snow that sifted down;
    Bent were her shoulders beneath their load,
    But high was her heart, for love was the goad
    That urged her on to the town.

    Ere the sun went down was her promise kept,
    The little ones feasted before they slept;
    While the father, sick in bed,
    Prayed softly, with tears and murmurs low,
    That his household darlings might never know
    A lack of their daily bread.

  9. Health

  10. Health

    Ah, what is fame and what is wealth,
    Matched with the rich renown of health?

    - Amos R. Wells
    Health
    by Amos Russel Wells

    Clear eyes, that dance with inward light;
    Clear shining skin, so firmly white;
    Muscles that tingle for the road
    Or lightly lift a gallant load;
    Serenity of steady nerves;
    Bright beauty's soft alluring curves;

    Alert response to sight and sound
    And fragrance of the year's glad round,—
    Ah, what is fame and what is wealth,
    Matched with the rich renown of health?
    And what does luxury possess,
    Bought with dyspepsia's wretchedness?
    Let all my singing days he spent
    With honest labor, calm content;
    Let sturdy body, eager mind,
    Their partnership superbly bind;
    And let my life's clear currents run
    Beneath the shining of the sun.

  11. Health and Wealth

    We squander health in search of wealth;
    We scheme and toil and save;
    Then squander wealth in search of health,
    But only find a grave.

    - Anonymous
    Health and Wealth
    by Anonymous

    We squander health in search of wealth;
    We scheme and toil and save;
    Then squander wealth in search of health,
    But only find a grave.
    We live, and boast of what we own;
    We die, and only get a stone.