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Sister Poems

Table of Contents

  1. The Days When We Were Young by Henry Clay Work
  2. Sing Me A Song by Christina Georgina Rossetti
  3. To My Sister In Heaven by Edith Willis Linn
  4. Sister's Harp by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott
  5. A Sister's Love by Kate Slaughter McKinney

  1. The Days When We Were Young

    by Henry Clay Work

    Sister! Sister! don't you remember
    The days when we were young?
    The long, long days, with a light and a shade
    Like the pearls of a necklace strung,
    Like the pearls of a necklace strung?
    They are gone, with all our yesterdays —
    We seek their like in vain;
    But we will shed no tears for them
    While the bright todays remain,
    While the bright todays remain.

    Sister! Sister! don't you remember
    The days when we were young?
    The homely house in the fat, far away,
    Where the love of our childhood clung,
    Where the love of our childhood clung?
    There is naught to mark that sacred spot,
    Save now the beaten loam;
    Yet distant altars have we rear'd
    In the bless-ed name of home,
    In the bless-ed name of home.

    Sister! Sister! don't you remember
    The days when we were young?
    The mates of childhood — the friend of our youth —
    We companion'd and lov'd among,
    We companion'd and lov'd among?
    Some are wand'ring far, and some in death
    Have closed their weary eyes;
    But we rejoice in new found friends,
    While we weep for broken ties,
    While we weep for broken ties.

  2. Sing Me A Song

    by Christina Georgina Rossetti

    Sing me a song —
    What shall I sing? —
    Three merry sisters
    Dancing in a ring,
    Light and fleet upon their feet
    As birds upon the wing.
    Tell me a tale —
    What shall I tell?
    Two mournful sisters,
    And a tolling knell,
    Tolling ding and tolling dong,
    Ding dong bell.

  3. To My Sister In Heaven

    But still, dear sister, though I often long
    To feel, to hear, to question and to see
    I know that you are sister none the less,
    And just as near and just as dear to me.

    - Edith Willis Linn
    A To My Sister In Heaven
    by Edith Willis Linn

    "Have you a sister?" strangers question me.
    I answer "No." But in my heart the while
    I hold the picture of a gentle face,
    A crown of golden curls, a heavenly smile.

    Dear sister! none the less my sister now
    Because I miss you in my earthly home,
    I cannot doubt that you are still to me
    All you had been, had Heaven not bid you come.

    Though you are pure from earthly stain and scar,
    Though you have grown to heights far, far above
    My loftiest dream; though angel, and most fair,
    You still must feel and own your sister-love.

    Death could not cheat me of that deep heart-joy.
    My hands have never lain in yours; my lips
    Have never rested on your face, my hair
    Has never felt your gentle finger-tips:

    But still, dear sister, though I often long
    To feel, to hear, to question and to see
    I know that you are sister none the less,
    And just as near and just as dear to me.

  4. Sister's Harp

    by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott

    When last those sweet notes I enjoy'd,
    O Sarah, thy hand gave the sound;
    But with angels thou now art employ'd,
    While thy harp seems to sigh at death's wound.

    How mournful's the strain that recalls
    Thy form so beloved to my mind;
    When the note of the wood-robbin falls,
    Deep sorrow and tears are combin'd.

    Though silent, thy harp seems to speak;
    Too transient these strings for her use;
    A harp of new strings, never weak,
    Thy sister holds forth to thy muse.

    The harp she has left thee behind,
    Is a pledge of the shortness of time;
    As her hand struck the last note sublime,
    May her sweet example be mine.

  5. A Sister's Love

    by Kate Slaughter McKinney

    She knelt beside her brother’s grave,
    The day was near its close;
    And where the cool, tall grasses wave,
    She lay a fresh-cut rose.
    Then, from a silver waiter near,
    She drew a wreath of white,
    Besprinkled with the twilight’s tear,
    O’ershaded with the night,
    And placed them on the green-kept mound.
    I watched her kneeling there,
    Her face bent on the sacred ground,
    In attitude of prayer;
    And while a bird sang soft his hymn,
    Down-looking from above,
    We saw unveiled a picture dim—
    A statue true of love.