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Apple Poems

Table of Contents

  1. Apple Song by Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts
  2. An Apple Gathering by Christina Rossetti
  3. by

  1. Apple Song

    by Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts

    O the sun has kissed the apples,
    Kissed the apples;
    And the apples, hanging mellow,
    Red and yellow,
    All down the orchard seen
    Make a glory in the green.

    The sun has kissed the apples,
    Kissed the apples;
    And the hollow barrels wait
    By the gate.
    The cider-presses drip
    With nectar for the lip.

    The sun has kissed the apples,
    Kissed the apples;
    And the yellow miles of grain
    Forget the rain.
    The happy gardens yet The winter's blight forget.

    The sun has kissed the apples,
    Kissed the apples;
    O'er the marsh the cattle spread,
    White and red.
    Thy sky is all as blue
    As a gentian in the dew.

    The sun has kissed the apples,
    Kissed the apples;
    And the maples are ablaze
    Through the haze.
    The crickets in their mirth
    Fife the fruiting song of earth.

    The sun has kissed the apples,
    Kissed the apples;
    Now with flocking call and stir
    Birds confer,
    As if their hearts were crost
    By a fear of coming frost.

    O the sun has kissed the apples,
    Kissed the apples;
    And the harvest air is sweet
    On the wheat.
    Delight is not for long,—
    Give us laughter, give us song!

  2. An Apple Gathering

    by Christina Rossetti

    I plucked pink blossoms from mine apple-tree,
    And wore them all that evening in my hair:
    Then in due season when I went to see
    I found no apples there.

    With dangling basket all along the grass
    As I had come I went the selfsame track:
    My neighbors mocked me while they saw me pass
    So empty-handed back.

    Lilian and Lilias smiled in trudging by,
    Their heaped-up basket teased me like a jeer;
    Sweet-voiced they sang beneath the sunset sky,
    Their mother's home was near.

    Plump Gertrude passed me with her basket full,
    A stronger hand than hers helped it along;
    A voice talked with her through the shadows cool
    More sweet to me than song.

    Ah, Willie, Willie, was my love less worth
    Than apples with their green leaves piled above?
    I counted rosiest apples on the earth
    Of far less worth than love.

    So once it was with me you stooped to talk
    Laughing and listening in this very lane:
    To think that by this way we used to walk
    We shall not walk again!

    I let my neighbors pass me, ones and twos
    And groups; the latest said the night grew chill,
    And hastened: but I loitered, while the dews
    Fell fast I loitered still.