close close2 chevron-circle-left chevron-circle-right twitter bookmark4 facebook3 twitter3 pinterest3 feed4 envelope star quill

Poems About Disappointment

Table of Contents

  1. Disenchantment by Emily Dickinson
  2. Disappointed by Laurence Dunbar
  3. Disappointment by Richard Lynott O'Malley
  4. Penalty by Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  5. Disappointment by Mary E. Tucker
  6. Wolsey's Farewell to his Greatness by John Fletcher

  1. Disenchantment

    by Emily Dickinson

    It dropped so low in my regard
    I heard it hit the ground,
    And go to pieces on the stones
    At bottom of my mind;

    Yet blamed the fate that fractured, less
    Than I reviled myself
    For entertaining plated wares
    Upon my silver shelf.

  2. Disappointed

    by Laurence Dunbar

    An old man planted and dug and tended,
    Toiling in joy from dew to dew;
    The sun was kind, and the rain befriended;
    Fine grew his orchard and fair to view.
    Then he said: "I will quiet my thrifty fears,
    For here is fruit for my failing years."

    But even then the storm-clouds gathered,
    Swallowing up the azure sky;
    The sweeping winds into white foam lathered
    The placid breast of the bay, hard by;
    Then the spirits that raged in the darkened air
    Swept o'er his orchard and left it bare.

    The old man stood in the rain, uncaring,
    Viewing the place the storm had swept;
    And then with a cry from his soul despairing,
    He bowed him down to the earth and wept.
    But a voice cried aloud from the driving rain;
    "Arise, old man, and plant again!"

  3. Disappointment

    Then I thought "It is thus with full many a life;
    Each hope comes and goes like a breath;
    And the mortal toils on with vain hope through the strife,
    From childhood to manhood and death."

    – Richard Lynott O'Malley
    Disappointment
    by Richard Lynott O'Malley

    I awoke at the dawn of a school holiday,
    And the heavens with clouds were o'ercast;
    And I prayed for the sunlight's tiniest ray,
    But the rain fell heavy and fast,
    Then I calmed my heart with the hope that soon
    It would clear; and the sun at last
    I saw, and I hoped, but alas! at noon
    The rain fell heavy and fast.

    Now faster and faster poured the rain,
    Still I hoped through the storm and the blast;
    And the night came frowning; my hopes were vain,
    For the rain fell heavy and fast.
    Ah! my holiday fled on her own rainy wind,
    And my hopes followed close on her flight;
    But the cold disappointment still clouded my mind
    Which had chilled me from morning till night.
    Then I thought "It is thus with full many a life;
    Each hope comes and goes like a breath;
    And the mortal toils on with vain hope through the strife,
    From childhood to manhood and death."

  4. Penalty

    by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

    Because of the fullness of what I had
    All that I have seems void and vain.
    If I had not been happy, I were not sad,
    Though my salt is savorless, why complain?

    From the ripe perfection of what was mine,
    All that is mine seems worse than naught.
    Yet I know as I sit in the dark and pine,
    No cup could be drained which had not been fraught.

    From the throb, and thrill, of a day that was,
    The day that now is seems dull with gloom.
    Yet I bear its dullness and darkness because
    'Tis but the reaction of glow and bloom.

    From the royal feasts which of old was spread
    I am starved on the diet which now is mine;
    Yet I could not turn hungry from water and bread,
    If I had not been sated on fruit and wine.

  5. Disappointment

    by Mary E. Tucker

    Oh, how can I live in a torture so wild,
    And yet always be dreaming of bliss?
    Why not learn Fate has doomed me to be sorrow's child,
    And in meekness the heavy rod kiss?

    I have lived for long months in a bright land of dreams,
    Dawning roseate as th' opening of day;
    But alas! the bright tints were but lightning gleams,
    Flashing wrath, and then fading away.

    The bliss of the soul I have constantly sought,
    But alas! I have sought it in vain;
    On earth its base semblance is rended and bought,
    And I never will seek it again.

    How I long for some spot in the solitude deep,
    All alone I could dwell there for years;
    My only companion, Repentance, and weep
    Living fountains of sorrowful tears.

    I feel we are drifting too surely apart,
    And sadly I think of the pain,
    For my loss, which will gnaw the proud core of your heart,
    As alone you sail over life's main.

    Oh, why do I sorrow? I know there is rest
    For the weary, in mansions above;
    And I long to go home to the land of the blest,
    And drink deep of God's pardoning love.

  6. Wolsey's Farewell to his Greatness

    by John Fletcher

    Farewell! a long farewell, to all my greatness!
    This is the state of man: to-day he puts forth
    The tender leaves of hopes; to-morrow blossoms,
    And bears his blushing honours thick upon him;
    The third day comes a frost, a killing frost,
    And when he thinks, good easy man, full surely
    His greatness is a-ripening, nips his root,
    And then he falls, as I do. I have ventured,
    Like little wanton boys that swim on bladders,
    This many summers in a sea of glory,
    But far beyond my depth: my high-blown pride
    At length broke under me and now has left me,
    Weary and old with service, to the mercy
    Of a rude stream, that must forever hide me.
    Vain pomp and glory of this world, I hate ye:
    I feel my heart new opened. O, how wretched
    Is that poor man that hangs on princes’ favours!
    There is betwixt that smile we would aspire to,
    That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin,
    More pangs and fears than wars or women have:
    And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer,
    Never to hope again.