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Poems About Games

Table of Contents

  1. With A Pocket Chess Board by Samuel W. Strauss
  2. A Shuffle by John B. Tabb
  3. "One, Two, Three!" by Henry Cuyler Bunner
  4. The Queen of Hearts by Anonymous

  1. With A Pocket Chess Board

    by Samuel W. Strauss

    Sing a song of problems—
    A pocket full of chess;
    Two and thirty question marks
    To make you sit and guess.

    The Rooks are in the corners,
    Waiting for to castle—
    The Pawns are on the firing line,
    Ready for a wrastle—

    The Queen is on her color,
    The Knights are all on deck,
    The Bishops guard His Majesty
    To keep him out of check.

    When the board is opened,
    The men are keen to start—
    Isn't that a dandy thing
    To carry next your heart?

  2. A Shuffle

    by John B. Tabb

    There was a rumpus in the Pack,
    Whereof the King and Queen and Jack
    Were playing knavish parts.
    On Club and Spade was put the blame;
    But these asserted 'twas a game
    Of Diamonds and Hearts.

  3. "One, Two, Three!"

    by Henry Cuyler Bunner

    It was an old, old, old, old lady,
    And a boy that was half past three;
    And the way that they played together
    Was beautiful to see.

    She couldn't go running and jumping,
    And the boy, no more could he;
    For he was a thin little fellow,
    With a thin little twisted knee,

    They sat in the yellow sunlight,
    Out under the maple-tree;
    And the game that they played I'll tell you,
    Just as it was told to me.

    It was Hide-and-Go-Seek they were playing,
    Though you'd never have known it to be—
    With an old, old, old, old lady,
    And a boy with a twisted knee.

    The boy would bend his face down
    On his one little sound right knee,
    And he'd guess where she was hiding,
    In guesses One, Two, Three!

    "You are in the china-closet!"
    He would cry, and laugh with glee—
    It wasn't the china-closet;
    But he still had Two and Three.

    "You are up in Papa's big bedroom,
    In the chest with the queer old key!"
    And she said: "You are warm and warmer;
    But you're not quite right," said she.

    "It can't be the little cupboard
    Where Mamma's things used to be—
    So it must be the clothes-press, Gran'ma!"
    And he found her with his Three.

    Then she covered her face with her fingers,
    That were wrinkled and white and wee,
    And she guessed where the boy was hiding,
    With a One and a Two and a Three.

    And they never had stirred from their places,
    Right under the maple-tree—
    This old, old, old, old lady,
    And the boy with the lame little knee—
    This dear, dear, dear old lady,
    And the boy who was half past three.

  4. The Queen of Hearts

    by Anonymous

    The Queen of Hearts
    She made some tarts,
    All on a summer's day;
    The Knave of Hearts
    He stole those tarts,
    And took them clean away.
    The King of Hearts
    Called for the tarts,
    And beat the knave full sore;
    The Knave of Hearts
    Brought back the tarts,
    And vowed he'd steal no more.