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Poems About the Sun

Table of Contents

  1. Good-Morning, Sun by Annette Wynne
  2. The Juggler of Day by Emily Dickinson
  3. She sweeps with many-colored brooms by Emily Dickinson
  4. The Sun Travels by Robert Louis Stevenson
  5. Superfluous were the sun by Emily Dickinson
  6. The daisy follows soft the sun by Emily Dickinson
  7. The Sun's Wooing by Emily Dickinson
  8. The Campfire of the Sun by Bliss Carman
  9. A Sunstroke by John B. Tabb
  10. Lord of Morning by Bliss Carman
  11. Dance of the Sunbeams by Bliss Carman
  12. Ode to the Sun by Eloise Bibb
  13. If I Were A Sunbeam by Alice Cary
  14. The Sunbeam by Richard Coe
  15. Mining the Sunshine by Amos Russel Wells
  16. The Sun and a Birch Tree by Elizabeth Madox Roberts


4...In them [the heavens] hath he set a tabernacle for the sun, 5Which is as a bridegroom coming out of his chamber, and rejoiceth as a strong man to run a race. 6His going forth is from the end of the heaven, and his circuit unto the ends of it: and there is nothing hid from the heat thereof.

– King David
Psalms 19:4b-6, KJV
  1. Good-Morning, Sun

    by Annette Wynne

    Good-morning, Sun,
    Work's begun
    For every one;
    While you stay
    And make our day
    Let me be as true
    And good as you.

    So,
    When you go
    Out to the West
    I shall be glad for rest
    And glad for the day
    That went away.

    Good-morning, Sun,
    Work's begun,
    And play—
    Thank you for the day!

  2. The Juggler of Day

    by Emily Dickinson

    Blazing in gold and quenching in purple,
    Leaping like leopards to the sky,
    Then at the feet of the old horizon
    Laying her spotted face, to die;

    Stooping as low as the otter's window,
    Touching the roof and tinting the barn,
    Kissing her bonnet to the meadow, —
    And the juggler of day is gone!

  3. She sweeps with many-colored brooms

    by Emily Dickinson

    She sweeps with many-colored brooms,
    And leaves the shreds behind;
    Oh, housewife in the evening west,
    Come back, and dust the pond!

    You dropped a purple ravelling in,
    You dropped an amber thread;
    And now you've littered all the East
    With duds of emerald!

    And still she plies her spotted brooms,
    And still the aprons fly,
    Till brooms fade softly into stars —
    And then I come away.

  4. The Sun Travels

    by Robert Louis Stevenson

    The sun is not a-bed, when I
    At night upon my pillow lie;
    Still round the earth his way he takes,
    And morning after morning makes.

    While here at home, in shining day,
    We round the sunny garden play,
    Each little Indian sleepy-head
    Is being kissed and put to bed.

    And when at eve I rise from tea,
    Day dawns beyond the Atlantic Sea;
    And all the children in the West
    Are getting up and being dressed.

  5. Superfluous were the sun

    by Emily Dickinson

    Superfluous were the sun
    When excellence is dead;
    He were superfluous every day,
    For every day is said

    That syllable whose faith
    Just saves it from despair,
    And whose 'I'll meet you' hesitates
    If love inquire, 'Where?'

    Upon his dateless fame
    Our periods may lie,
    As stars that drop anonymous
    From an abundant sky.

  6. The daisy follows soft the sun

    by Emily Dickinson

    The daisy follows soft the sun,
    And when his golden walk is done,
    Sits shyly at his feet.
    He, waking, finds the flower near.
    "Wherefore, marauder, art thou here?"
    "Because, sir, love is sweet!"

    We are the flower, Thou the sun!
    Forgive us, if as days decline,
    We nearer steal to Thee, —
    Enamoured of the parting west,
    The peace, the flight, the amethyst,
    Night's possibility!

  7. The Sun's Wooing

    by Emily Dickinson

    The sun just touched the morning;
    The morning, happy thing,
    Supposed that he had come to dwell,
    And life would be all spring.

    She felt herself supremer, —
    A raised, ethereal thing;
    Henceforth for her what holiday!
    Meanwhile, her wheeling king

    Trailed slow along the orchards
    His haughty, spangled hems,
    Leaving a new necessity, —
    The want of diadems!

    The morning fluttered, staggered,
    Felt feebly for her crown, —
    Her unanointed forehead
    Henceforth her only one.

  8. The Campfire of the Sun

    by Bliss Carman

    Lo, now, the journeying sun,
    Another day's march done,
    Kindles his campfire at the edge of night!
    And in the twilight pale
    Above his crimson trail,
    The stars move out their cordons still and bright.

    Now in the darkening hush
    A solitary thrush
    Sings on in silvery rapture to the deep;
    While brooding on her best,
    The wandering soul has rest,
    And earth receives her sacred gift of sleep.

  9. A Sunstroke

    by John B. Tabb

    The Sun courted Water,
    Earth's loveliest daughter,
    And strove to abduct her in vain:
    For, when he had caught her,
    And to the clouds brought her,
    Home she came running in rain.

  10. Lord of Morning

    by Bliss Carman (from "Songs of the Grass")

    Lord of morning, light of day,
    Sacred color-kindling sun,
    We salute thee in the way,—
    Pilgrims robed in rose and dun.

    For thou art a pilgrim too,
    Overlord of all our band.
    In thy fervor we renew
    Quests we do not understand.

    At thy summons we arise,
    At thy touch put glory on,
    And with glad unanxious eyes
    Take the journey thou hast gone.

  11. Dance of the Sunbeams

    by Bliss Carman

    When morning is high o'er the hilltops,
    On river and stream and lake,
    Wherever a young breeze whispers,
    The sun-clad dancers wake.

    One after one up-springing,
    They flash from their dim retreat.
    Merry as running laughter
    Is the news of their twinkling feet.

    Over the floors of azure
    Wherever the wind-flaws run,
    Sparkling, leaping, and racing,
    Their antics scatter the sun.

    As long as water ripples
    And weather is clear and glad,
    Day after day they are dancing,
    Never a moment sad.

    But when through the field of heaven
    The wings of storm take flight,
    At a touch of the flying shadows
    They falter and slip from sight.

    Until at the gray day's ending,
    As the squadrons of cloud retire,
    They pass in the triumph of sunset
    With banners of crimson fire.

  12. Ode to the Sun

    by Eloise Bibb

    How many scenes, O sun,
    Hast thou not shone upon!
    How many tears, O light,
    Have dropped before thy sight!
    How many heart-felt sighs,
    How many piercing cries,
    How many deeds of woe,
    Dost thy bright light not know!

    How many broken hearts,
    That are pierced by sorrow's darts;
    How many maddened brains,
    That are wild with passion's rains;
    How many soul-sick lives,
    Stabbed with despair's sharp knives,
    Hast thou above the skies,
    Not seen with thy radiant eyes!

    Shine on, majestic one!
    Shine on, O glorious sun!
    And never fail to cheer
    My life so dark and drear.
    Whene'er thou shinest bright,
    And show thy brilliant light,
    The cares I know each day
    Silently steal away.

  13. If I Were A Sunbeam

    by Alice Cary

    "If I were a sunbeam,
    I know what I'd do;
    I would seek white lilies,
    Roaming woodlands through.
    I would steal among them,
    Softest light I'd shed,
    Until every lily
    Raised its drooping head.

    "If I were a sunbeam,
    I know where I'd go;
    Into lowly hovels,
    Dark with want and woe:
    Till sad hearts looked upward,
    I would shine and shine;
    Then they'd think of heaven,
    Their sweet home and mine."

    Are you not a sunbeam,
    Child, whose life is glad
    With an inner brightness
    Sunshine never had?
    Oh, as God has blessed you,
    Scatter light divine!
    For there is no sunbeam
    But must die or shine.

  14. The Sunbeam

    by Richard Coe

    The sunbeam, the sunbeam,
    It cheers the drooping heart
    To see the glorious sunbeam
    Its golden light impart.

    The sunbeam, the sunbeam,
    It smiles on the earth;
    And through the jewels of the sky
    The rainbow springs to birth.

    So, like the sunbeam, let us strive
    That our glad light be given
    To bless and beautify the earth,
    And turn our thoughts to heaven!

  15. Mining the Sunshine

    by Amos Russel Wells

    Some day, when the hollow mines
    Yield their final, grudging toll,
    When from out those drear confines
    Comes the last black lump of coal,
    Then, in chill and dark despair
    We shall learn to look on high
    To the quarry of the air,
    To the coal-fields of the sky!

    Where the sun in quietness
    Bends his ample daily course,
    There descends to cheer and bless
    A Niagara of force.
    Steadily 'tis pouring down,
    An incessant, copious yield,
    On the house-tops of the town,
    On the reaches of the field

    Here no strike and no combine
    Will disturb the course of trade
    Every man will boldly mine
    In the sunfield unafraid
    Every man will take his own
    Fuel to his utmost need
    And the sun upon his throne
    Will rebuke our human greed

  16. The Sun and a Birch Tree

    by Elizabeth Madox Roberts

    As I came home through Howard's lane,
    The trees were bending down with rain.

    A still mist went across their tops,
    And my coat was powdered gray with drops.

    Then I looked in the woods to see
    The limbs of the white birch tree.

    It made a bright spot in the air,
    And I thought the sun was shining there.


I will show you what is glorious. The sun is glorious. When he shineth in the clear sky, when he sitteth on his throne in the heavens, and looketh abroad over the earth, he is the most glorious and excellent object the eye can behold.

– John Keble
The Creator

The night has a thousand eyes,
And the day but one;
Yet the light of the bright world dies
With the dying sun.

– Francis William Bourdillon
The Night Has a Thousand Eyes

Late lies the wintry sun a-bed,
A frosty, fiery sleepy-head;
Blinks but an hour or two; and then,
A blood-red orange, sets again.

– Robert Louis Stevenson
Winter-Time