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Friendship Poems

Table of Contents

  1. No Man is an Island by John Donne
  2. Addition by Anonymous
  3. Who? by Emily Dickinson
  4. Croesus Discovers by Anonymous
  5. Chums by J. W. Foley
  6. Friendship by Jean Racine, Thomas Fry
  7. Friendship by William Francis Barnard
  8. To Friendship by Benjamin Hine
  9. I. by Christopher Pearse Cranch
  10. Friendship by Henry David Thoreau
  11. Pray for Me by Amos Russel Wells
  12. A Soul I Met by Ruby Archer
  13. The Enchanted Traveller by Bliss Carman
  1. A Live Wire by Anonymous
  2. Till the End by Emily Dickinson
  3. If anybody's friend be dead by Emily Dickinson
  4. Solitude by Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  5. Friendship by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott
  6. Old Friends Together by Charles Swain
  7. The House by the Side of the Road by Sam Walter Foss
  8. Friendship's Tone And Laugh by Richard Lynott O'Malley
  9. Meeting of Friends After a Long Absence by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott
  10. The Meeting of the Waters by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott
  11. Parting of Three Friends by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott
  12. The Kindly Neighbor by Edgar A. Guest
  13. Friendship by Ralph Waldo Emerson
  14. The Memory of the Heart by Daniel Webster
  15. Parted Friends by James Montgomery
  16. Our Friendship by Ellen P. Allerton
  17. Written in an Album by Hannah Flagg Gould


Always remember, if you want to have friends, than be one.

  1. No Man is an Island

    No man is an island,
    Entire of itself,

    - John Donne
    No Man is an Island
    by John Donne

    No man is an island,
    Entire of itself,
    Every man is a piece of the continent,
    A part of the main.
    If a clod be washed away by the sea,
    Europe is the less.
    As well as if a promontory were.
    As well as if a manor of thy friend's
    Or of thine own were:
    Any man's death diminishes me,
    Because I am involved in mankind,
    And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls;
    It tolls for thee.

  2. Addition

    But wheresoe'er these friends may be,
    Each is an increment for me,—
    My life is all a happy sum;
    I'll add as long as figures come!

    - Anonymous
    Addition
    by Anonymous

    I am myself—poor, foolish, weak—
    Plus other men to whom I speak,
    The stronger men with whom I walk,
    And watch their ways and heed their talk.

    Some are alive with whom I tread,
    And some are those that men call dead;
    Some I accost in shop or street,
    And some in blessed books I meet.

    But wheresoe'er these friends may be,
    Each is an increment for me,—
    My life is all a happy sum;
    I'll add as long as figures come!

  3. Who?

    by Emily Dickinson

    My friend must be a bird,
    Because it flies!
    Mortal my friend must be,
    Because it dies!
    Barbs has it, like a bee.
    Ah, curious friend,
    Thou puzzlest me!

  4. Croesus Discovers

    by Anonymous

    I thought I was a poor man all my days,
    And only late I knew
    Riches that filled my soul with glad amaze,
    All-marvellous to view.

    How am I shamed that I have hung my head
    The way a pauper bends!
    I should have walked the earth a king instead;
    My friends—I had my friends!

  5. Chums

    But a boy has one boy he can go to,
    For help all the time—that's his chum.

    - J.W. Foley
    Chums
    by J. W. Foley

    If we should be shipwrecked together
    And only had water for one,
    And it was the hottest of weather
    Right out in the boiling sun,
    He'd tell me—no matter how bad he
    Might want it—to take a drink first;
    And then he would smile—oh, so glad he
    Had saved me!—and perish from thirst!

    Or, if we were lost on the prairie
    And only had food for a day,
    He'd come and would give me the share he
    Had wrapped up and hidden away;
    And after I ate it with sadness
    He'd smile with his very last breath,
    And lay himself down full of gladness
    To save me—and starve right to death.

    And if I was wounded in battle
    And out where great danger might be,
    He'd come through the roar and the rattle
    Of guns and of bullets to me,
    He'd carry me out, full of glory,
    No matter what trouble he had,
    And then he would fall down, all gory
    With wounds, and would die—but be glad!

    We're chums—that's the reason he'd do it;
    And that's what a chum ought to be.
    And if it was fire he'd go through it,
    If I should call him to me.
    You see other fellows may know you,
    And friends that you have go and come;
    But a boy has one boy he can go to,
    For help all the time—that's his chum.

  6. Friendship

    Give me the friend, who, like the evergreen,
    Retains his first appearance, though the storm
    Beat with tremendous fury on his head;

    - Jean Racine, Thomas Fry
    Friendship
    by Jean Racine, Thomas Fry

    While fair prosperity illumes our path,
    Numerous pretended friends and counsellors
    Bask in the sunshine with deceitful smiles;
    But when the winter of distress draws nigh,
    They sink like summer-insects at the blast.
    Give me the friend, who, like the evergreen,
    Retains his first appearance, though the storm
    Beat with tremendous fury on his head;
    And through the dreary winter cheers the eye,
    With spring in expectation. Thus the plant
    That clings so closely to the sturdy oak,
    Quits not its fond attachment e'en in death,
    But still embraces its once thriving friend.


    Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep.

    – Romans 12:15
    The Bible, KJV
  7. Friendship

    Amidst the loathing and the scorn
    Some hands will faithful be;
    If honors thicken such will yet
    Give love's simplicity.

    - William Francis Barnard
    Friendship
    by William Francis Barnard

    We cannot rise too high for this;
    We cannot fall too low.
    Or praised as gods, or in the dust,
    It follows where we go.

    It is not gained through noble deeds;
    It shrinks not from life's hurts.
    Too humble 'tis for pride to taint,
    Too great to seek deserts.

    Its sacred solace all accept
    Nor ponder on the cause;
    It is of things that ask no rule,
    That stand above the laws.

    Of things upon no judgment built;
    No weighing of the mind—
    The hunger of the human heart
    To treasure still its kind.

    Amidst the loathing and the scorn
    Some hands will faithful be;
    If honors thicken such will yet
    Give love's simplicity.

    Our morning sun, it shines when strength
    Keeps failure from us far;
    And when we sink, and strive no more,
    It glows, our evening star.

  8. To Friendship

    A chosen few, whose friendship pure,
    Throughout all changes would endure.
    Whose souls embrace the mighty plan,
    Of love to God, and love to man.

    - Benjamin Hine
    To Friendship
    by Benjamin Hine

    Were there none to use thy name,
    But such as feel thy sacred flame,
    None but those who friends would be,
    Were we in adversity.
    And whether fortune frowned or smiled,
    Heaped her favours or withheld,
    A friend unshaken would remain,
    To soothe our grief, to ease our pain,
    To help in every time of need,
    And thus evince a friend indeed.

    How long might thou neglected lie,
    Even obsolete become, and die,
    Or from our language be erased,
    Thy import lost, thy name effaced;
    And is it thus, and can it be?
    O, no, forbid it charity.
    Are there not some might justly claim,
    Without abuse, thy hallowed name?
    A chosen few, whose friendship pure,
    Throughout all changes would endure.
    Whose souls embrace the mighty plan,
    Of love to God, and love to man.


    A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.

    – Proverbs 17:17
    The Bible, KJV

  9. I.

    And age grows young in friendship's quickening sun.

    - Christopher Pearse Cranch
    VII.
    by Christopher Pearse Cranch

    Those times are gone, that circle thinned away,
    And we who live, now scattered far and wide,
    Each in our separate centres fixed abide,
    Round which new interests now revolve and play
    In separate loves and duties day by day.
    Yet, by the records of old loves allied,
    We clasp each other's hands beneath the tide
    Of time, and cling together as we may.
    Even so beneath the sea the throbbing wires
    That bind the sundered continents in one,
    In space-annihilating pulses thrill
    With swift-winged words and purpose and desires.
    Our earlier visions haunt our memories still,
    And age grows young in friendship's quickening sun.

  10. Friendship

    by Henry David Thoreau

    I think awhile of Love, and while I think,
    Love is to me a world,
    Sole meat and sweetest drink,
    And close connecting link
    Tween heaven and earth.

    I only know it is, not how or why,
    My greatest happiness;
    However hard I try,
    Not if I were to die,
    Can I explain.

    I fain would ask my friend how it can be,
    But when the time arrives,
    Then Love is more lovely
    Than anything to me,
    And so I'm dumb.

    For if the truth were known, Love cannot speak,
    But only thinks and does;
    Though surely out 'twill leak
    Without the help of Greek,
    Or any tongue.

    A man may love the truth and practise it,
    Beauty he may admire,
    And goodness not omit,
    As much as may befit
    To reverence.

    But only when these three together meet,
    As they always incline,
    And make one soul the seat,
    And favorite retreat,
    Of loveliness;

    When under kindred shape, like loves and hates
    And a kindred nature,
    Proclaim us to be mates,
    Exposed to equal fates
    Eternally;

    And each may other help, and service do,
    Drawing Love's bands more tight,
    Service he ne'er shall rue
    While one and one make two,
    And two are one;

    In such case only doth man fully prove
    Fully as man can do,
    What power there is in Love
    His inmost soul to move
    Resistlessly.

    * * * * *

    Two sturdy oaks I mean, which side by side,
    Withstand the winter's storm,
    And spite of wind and tide,
    Grow up the meadow's pride,
    For both are strong

    Above they barely touch, but undermined
    Down to their deepest source,
    Admiring you shall find
    Their roots are intertwined
    Insep'rably.

  11. Pray for Me

    Still for myself I'll work and pray,
    And toil along my blundering way;
    But doubled all my strength will be
    If you, O friend, will pray for me!

    - Amos Russel Wells
    Pray for Me
    by Amos Russel Wells

    On faith's mysterious heights you stand,
    And reach and grasp the Father's hand.
    Oh, with that access hold and free,
    Place a petition there for me!

    I grope in fogs. Your vision, clear
    In faith's serener atmosphere,
    Oh, use victoriously for me,
    And paint the heaven I cannot see!

    Too cold my tongue, too dull my ear,
    Earth's nobler words to speak or hear.
    Oh, while I learn the lower song,
    Sing you for me in heaven's throng!

    Still for myself I'll work and pray,
    And toil along my blundering way;
    But doubled all my strength will be
    If you, O friend, will pray for me!

  12. A Soul I Met

    by Ruby Archer

    I must tell of a soul I met,
    Peaceful and strong and free,
    Pure in its constancy,
    Of a charm that I cannot forget.

    Heart-sick, I wearied of life,—
    All seemed playing a part,
    Nowhere an honest heart,
    All the world a wrangle and strife.

    Where the glorious mountains laid
    Their heads on the breast of the sky
    And slept while the wind sang by,—
    There my hurrying feet where stayed.

    While the glory and peace and rest
    Brooded above my thought,
    Weary and over-wrought,—
    Came the soul, and my life was blest.

  13. The Enchanted Traveller

    We travelled empty-handed
    With hearts all fear above,
    For we ate the bread of friendship,
    We drank the wine of love.

    - Bliss Carman
    The Enchanted Traveller
    by Bliss Carman

    We travelled empty-handed
    With hearts all fear above,
    For we ate the bread of friendship,
    We drank the wine of love.

    Through many a wondrous autumn,
    Through many a magic spring,
    We hailed the scarlet banners,
    We heard the blue-bird sing.

    We looked on life and nature
    With the eager eyes of youth,
    And all we asked or cared for
    Was beauty, joy, and truth.

    We found no other wisdom,
    We learned no other way,
    Than the gladness of the morning,
    The glory of the day.

    So all our earthly treasure
    Shall go with us, my dears,
    Aboard the Shadow Liner,
    Across the sea of years.

  14. A Live Wire

    by Anonymous

    I did not know—so awkward I,
    So fumbling in my speech—
    That I had touched a quivering nerve
    No man might safely reach.

    A burst, a flash, a deadly blow,
    A friendship numb for aye,
    What other end may one expect,
    If one with lightnings play?

  15. Till the End

    by Emily Dickinson

    I should not dare to leave my friend,
    Because — because if he should die
    While I was gone, and I — too late —
    Should reach the heart that wanted me;

    If I should disappoint the eyes
    That hunted, hunted so, to see,
    And could not bear to shut until
    They "noticed" me — they noticed me;

    If I should stab the patient faith
    So sure I'd come — so sure I'd come,
    It listening, listening, went to sleep
    Telling my tardy name, —

    My heart would wish it broke before,
    Since breaking then, since breaking then,
    Were useless as next morning's sun,
    Where midnight frosts had lain!

  16. If anybody's friend be dead

    by Emily Dickinson

    If anybody's friend be dead,
    It 's sharpest of the theme
    The thinking how they walked alive,
    At such and such a time.

    Their costume, of a Sunday,
    Some manner of the hair, —
    A prank nobody knew but them,
    Lost, in the sepulchre.

    How warm they were on such a day:
    You almost feel the date,
    So short way off it seems; and now,
    They 're centuries from that.

    How pleased they were at what you said;
    You try to touch the smile,
    And dip your fingers in the frost:
    When was it, can you tell,

    You asked the company to tea,
    Acquaintance, just a few,
    And chatted close with this grand thing
    That don't remember you?

    Past bows and invitations,
    Past interview, and vow,
    Past what ourselves can estimate, —
    That makes the quick of woe!

  17. Solitude

    Be glad, and your friends are many;
    Be sad, and you lose them all,
    There are none to decline your nectar'd wine,
    But alone you must drink life's gall.

    - Ella Wheeler Wilcox
    Solitude
    by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

    Laugh, and the world laughs with you,
    Weep, and you weep alone;
    For the sad old earth must borrow its mirth,
    But has trouble enough of its own.

    Sing, and the hills will answer,
    Sigh, it is lost on the air;
    The echoes bound to a joyful sound,
    But shirk from voicing care.

    Rejoice and men will seek you;
    Grieve, and they turn and go;
    They want full measure of all your pleasure,
    But they do not need your woe.

    Be glad, and your friends are many;
    Be sad, and you lose them all,
    There are none to decline your nectar'd wine,
    But alone you must drink life's gall.

    Feast, and your halls are crowded;
    Fast, and the world goes by;
    Succeed and give, and it helps you live,
    But no man can help you die.

    There is room in the halls of pleasure
    For a large and lordly train,
    But one by one we must all file on
    Through the narrow aisle of pain.


    Carry each other's burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.

    – Galations 6:2
    The Bible, NIV

  18. Friendship

    by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott

    How dear and bless'd the name
    Of friendship's golden chain;
    She leads the happy mind
    Where virtues are combin'd.

    In peace, content, and love,
    Thus we true friendship prove,
    An interchange of joy,
    Which nothing can destroy.

    A confidence is join'd
    To mingle souls refin'd,
    And angels listen there,
    Such tidings to declare.

  19. Old Friends Together

    by Charles Swain

    I.
    Oh, time is sweet, when roses meet
    With Spring's sweet breath around then;
    And sweet the cost, when hearts are lost,
    If those we love have found them!
    And sweet the Mind, that still can find
    A star in darkest weather!
    But nought can be so sweet to see,
    As old friends met together!

    II.
    Those days of old, when youth was bold,
    And Time stole wings to speed it,
    And youth ne'er knew how fast time flew—
    Or knowing, did not heed it!
    Though gray each brow that meets us now—
    For age brings wintry weather—
    Yet nought can be so sweet to see
    As those old friends together!

    III.
    The few long known, that years have shown,
    With hearts that friendship blesses;
    A hand to cheer—perchance, a tear
    To soothe a friend's distresses!
    That helped and tried—still side by side—
    A friend to face hard weather;
    Oh, thus may we yet joy to see,
    And meet old friends together!

  20. The House by the Side of the Road

    Let me live in a house by the side of the road
    And be a friend to man.

    - Sam Walter Foss
    The House by the Side of the Road
    by Sam Walter Foss

    There are hermit souls that live withdrawn
    In the peace of their self-content;
    There are souls, like stars, that dwell apart,
    In a fellowless firmament;
    There are pioneer souls that blaze their paths
    Where highways never ran;—
    But let me live by the side of the road
    And be a friend to man.

    Let me live in a house by the side of the road,
    Where the race of men go by—
    The men who are good and the men who are bad,
    As good and as bad as I.
    I would not sit in the scorner’s seat,
    Or hurl the cynic’s ban;—
    Let me live in a house by the side of the road
    And be a friend to man.

    I see from my house by the side of the road,
    By the side of the highway of life,
    The men who press with the ardor of hope,
    The men who are faint with the strife.
    But I turn not away from their smiles nor their tears—
    Both parts of an infinite plan;—
    Let me live in my house by the side of the road
    And be a friend to man.

    I know there are brook-gladdened meadows ahead
    And mountains of wearisome height;
    That the road passes on through the long afternoon
    And stretches away to the night.
    But still I rejoice when the travelers rejoice,
    And weep with the strangers that moan,
    Nor live in my house by the side of the road
    Like a man who dwells alone.

    Let me live in my house by the side of the road
    Where the race of men go by—
    They are good, they are bad, they are weak, they are strong,
    Wise, foolish— so am I.
    Then why should I sit in the scorner’s seat
    Or hurl the cynic’s ban?—
    Let me live in my house by the side of the road
    And be a friend to man.

  21. Friendship's Tone And Laugh

    by Richard Lynott O'Malley

    Though the bard wakes the string of old friendship much,
    And sings of the banqueting board,
    Yet how can I help but to give it a touch
    When my fingers are now on that chord.
    When the voice of old years echoes still in my ears,
    And my heart echoes back a response,
    And my carol the tone of new friendship endears
    As it laughs out its music at once.

    Blest blest are the ears that quaff
    Sweet Friendship's Tone and Laugh!
    What a thrilling ring! O who would not sing
    Of Friendship's Tone and Laugh!

    Alas, for the breast that is barren of this,
    A gift which was hallowed above!
    For they say that, of old, 'twas an Angel's kiss,
    And it came in the form of a dove:
    And believe it, sweet friend, I know it still lives,
    For I hear its fond music in thee;
    In thy bosom it lives, and each note that it gives
    Awakens an echo in me.

    Blest, blest are the ears that quaff, etc., etc.

    O sweet the emotion that old friends awake
    When they meet in the real old style;
    When they give to the hand a warm shake for a shake,
    And give a fond smile for a smile;
    And when they are met, and the banquet is set,
    And the cups around are given,
    And the cheek with a hallowed remembrance is wet,
    Oh what shall I call it but Heaven!

    Blest, blest are the ears that quaff, etc., etc.

  22. Meeting of Friends After a Long Absence

    by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott

    The features of my friend I know,
    Though years have roll'd between,
    For sure, the furrow'd cheek will show,
    Where friendship's smile hath been.

    That voice, though weak, still bears the sound,
    Of cheering notes to me;
    That eye, though dim, to mine is bound,
    For speaking looks agree.

    That brow I know, though mark'd with care,
    Its influence is the same,
    In all its weal or wo, I share,
    For friendship's hallowed name.

    More beautiful my friends appear,
    As sorrow o'er them rolls;
    And I can smile, or drop a tear,
    With such congenial souls.

    Tell not of wealth, with all its gain,
    (Unhallowed sound to me,)
    But tell how truth and grace maintain
    The soul forever free.

  23. The Meeting of the Waters

    by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott

    Flowing streams in all your windings stray,
    And fill the bosom of the swelling deep,
    There welcome to the home of waters stay,
    Where all your murmurs gently sink to sleep.

    Thus friendship, sweet resemblance of your course,
    In numerous channels the blest union fills;
    And as the dew of Hermon gently pours,
    It falls on Zion, fairest of the hills.

  24. Parting of Three Friends

    by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott

    O, when shall we three meet again,
    In friendly converse true;
    O, when shall we three hold the chain
    Of a kind interview.

    Perhaps ere we again shall meet,
    Decrepid age may steal,
    Engraving marks of time most fleet,
    And set his potent seal.

    Perhaps we ne'er this side the grave,
    May press each friendly hand;
    But know the separating wave,
    Shall not our thoughts withstand.

    Still let us hope to meet again,
    And taste true friendship's balm;
    Our joys we then will not refrain,
    For pleasures new will charm.

  25. A Time to Talk

    by Robert Frost

    When a friend calls to me from the road
    And slows his horse to a meaning walk,
    I don’t stand still and look around
    On all the hills I haven’t hoed,
    And shout from where I am, What is it?
    No, not as there is a time to talk.
    I thrust my hoe in the mellow ground,
    Blade-end up and five feet tall,
    And plod: I go up to the stone wall
    For a friendly visit.

  26. The Kindly Neighbor

    by Edgar A. Guest

    I have a kindly neighbor, one who stands
    Beside my gate and chats with me awhile,
    Gives me the glory of his radiant smile
    And comes at times to help with willing hands.
    No station high or rank this man commands,
    He, too, must trudge, as I, the long day's mile;
    And yet, devoid of pomp or gaudy style,
    He has a worth exceeding stocks or lands.

    To him I go when sorrow's at my door,
    On him I lean when burdens come my way,
    Together oft we talk our trials o'er
    And there is warmth in each good-night we say.
    A kindly neighbor! Wars and strife shall end
    When man has made the man next door his friend.

  27. Friendship

    by Ralph Waldo Emerson

    A ruddy drop of manly blood
    The surging sea outweighs;
    The world uncertain comes and goes,
    The lover rooted stays.
    I fancied he was fled,—
    And, after many a year,
    Glowed unexhausted kindliness,
    Like daily sunrise there.
    My careful heart was free again;
    O friend, my bosom said,
    Through thee alone the sky is arched,
    Through thee the rose is red;
    All things through thee take nobler form,
    And look beyond the earth;
    The mill-round of our fate appears
    A sun-path in thy worth.
    Me too thy nobleness had taught
    To master my despair;
    The fountains of my hidden life
    Are through thy friendship fair.

  28. The Memory of the Heart

    by Daniel Webster

    If stores of dry and learned lore we gain,
    We keep them in the memory of the brain;
    Names, things, and facts—whate’er we knowledge call,
    There is the common ledger for them all;
    And images on this cold surface traced
    Make slight impressions, and are soon effaced.

    But we ’ve a page more glowing and more bright,
    On which our friendship and our love to write;
    That these may never from the soul depart,
    We trust them to the memory of the heart.
    There is no dimming—no effacement here;
    Each new pulsation keeps the record clear;
    Warm, golden letters, all the tablet fill,
    Nor lose their lustre till the heart stands still.

  29. Parted Friends

    by James Montgomery

    Friend after friend departs:
    Who hath not lost a friend?
    There is no union here of hearts
    That finds not here an end;
    Were this frail world our only rest,
    Living or dying, none were blest.

    Beyond the flight of time,
    Beyond this vale of death,
    There surely is some blessèd clime
    Where life is not a breath,
    Nor life’s affections transient fire,
    Whose sparks fly upward to expire.

    There is a world above,
    Where parting is unknown;
    A whole eternity of love,
    Formed for the good alone;
    And faith beholds the dying here
    Translated to that happier sphere.

    Thus star by star declines,
    Till all are passed away,
    As morning high and higher shines,
    To pure and perfect day;
    Nor sink those stars in empty night;
    They hide themselves in heaven’s own light.

  30. Our Friendship

    by Ellen P. Allerton

    They say true friendship changeth not,
    But grows and grows;
    Through chance, and time, and treacherous plot,
    Through change of scene and change of lot,
    Still changeless shows.

    If this be true, sure here is seen
    Some great mistake!
    The friend of years no friend hath been,
    Else naught on earth could come between,
    The bond to break.

    Am I, then, false? I meant no lie;
    Yet nevermore
    With friendship on my lip, can I,
    As oft aforetime, seek thine eye,
    Or cross thy door!

    Dost marvel why? 'Tis quickly told.
    Here at thy feet
    I fling away our friendship old,
    Because henceforth our two hearts hold
    A tie more sweet!

    I love thee! therefore can we be
    No longer friends.
    Thou takest what I offer thee—
    Thy whole heart's sweetness givest me.
    So friendship ends.

  31. Written in an Album

    That I may claim
    What she on memory may bestow
    In friendship's name—
    A smile, or tear, as joy or wo
    Shall mark the path where I may go!

    - Hannah Flagg Gould
    Written in an Album
    by Hannah Flagg Gould

    Thou tiny leaf,
    Thou art so small, so very small,
    I must be brief,
    If I would sully thee at all,
    With aught that from my pen may fall!

    Then haste from me;
    Go quick to Caroline, and show
    My wish, that she
    O'er no rude spot of earth, may go,
    Small as thyself, where thorns shall grow;—

    That there may be
    No cloud so broad in all her sky
    'T would shadow thee;
    Nor pain nor sorrow e'er come nigh
    To blanch her cheek, or dim her eye:—

    That I may claim
    What she on memory may bestow
    In friendship's name—
    A smile, or tear, as joy or wo
    Shall mark the path where I may go!


    For the friendship that hope and affection have brought —
    Thanksgiving! Thanksgiving!

    – Anonymous
    Giving Thanks