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I Miss You Poems

Table of Contents

  1. The Wind is Blowin' by Charles Badger Clark
  2. The Ship is Ready by Hannah Flagg Gould
  3. Your Voice by Ruby Archer
  4. Parting of Three Friends by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott
  5. Sister's Grave by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott
  6. The Deserted Arbor by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott
  7. To My Sister In Heaven by Edith Willis Linn
  8. You Never by Anonymous
  9. Absence by Lucien V. Rule
  10. Tired by Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  11. There is another sky by Emily Dickinson
  12. To Her by Charles Badger Clark
  13. Coming Home by Ellen P. Allerton
  14. I Blow You a Kiss by William Stanley Braithwaite
  15. When You Go by Jessie Belle Rittenhouse
  16. Alone by Ruby Archer
  17. Boat-Song by Ruby Archer
  18. Merchantmen by Ruby Archer
  19. To Yesterday by Ruby Archer
  20. Reunited Love Poems

  21. The Wall by Jessie Belle Rittenhouse
  22. The Home-Coming by Ruby Archer


Absence makes the heart grow fonder.

– Thomas Haynes Bayly
Isle of Beauty
  1. The Wind is Blowin'

    by Charles Badger Clark

    My tired hawse nickers for his own home bars;
    A hoof clicks out a spark.
    The dim creek flickers to the lonesome stars;
    The trail twists down the dark.
    The ridge pines whimper to the pines below.
    The wind is blowin' and I want you so.

    The birch has yellowed since I saw you last,
    The Fall haze blued the creeks,
    The big pine bellowed as the snow swished past,
    But still, above the peaks,
    The same stars twinkle that we used to know.
    The wind is blowin' and I want you so.

    The stars up yonder wait the end of time
    But earth fires soon go black.
    I trip and wander on the trail I climb—
    A fool who will look back
    To glimpse a fire dead a year ago.
    The wind is blowin' and I want you so.

    Who says the lover kills the man in me?
    Beneath the day's hot blue
    This thing hunts cover and my heart fights free
    To laugh an hour or two.
    But now it wavers like a wounded doe.
    The wind is blowin' and I want you so.

  2. The Ship is Ready

    by Hannah Flagg Gould

    Fare thee well! the ship is ready,
    And the breeze is fresh and steady.
    Hands are fast the anchor weighing;
    High in the air the streamer's playing.
    Spread the sails—the waves are swelling
    Proudly round thy buoyant dwelling,
    Fare thee well! and when at sea,
    Think of those, who sigh for thee.

    When from land and home receding,
    And from hearts, that ache to bleeding,
    Think of those behind, who love thee,
    While the sun is bright above thee!
    Then, as down to ocean glancing,
    With the waves his rays are dancing,
    Think how long the night will be
    To the eyes, that weep for thee.

    When the lonely night-watch keeping,
    All below thee still and sleeping—
    As the needle points the quarter
    O'er the wide and trackless water,
    Let thy vigils ever find thee
    Mindful of the friends behind thee!
    Let thy bosom's magnet be
    Turned to those, who wake for thee!

    When, with slow and gentle motion,
    Heaves the bosom of the ocean—
    While in peace thy bark is riding,
    And the silver moon is gliding
    O'er the sky with tranquil splendor,
    Where the shining hosts attend her;
    Let the brightest visions be
    Country, home and friends, to thee!

    When the tempest hovers o'er thee,
    Danger, wreck and death before thee,
    While the sword of fire is gleaming,
    Wild the winds, the torrent streaming,
    Then, a pious suppliant bending,
    Let thy thoughts to heaven ascending
    Reach the mercy-seat, to be
    Met by prayers that rise for thee!

  3. Your Voice

    by Ruby Archer

    Your voice is gone
    And every echo vanished
    To delicate vibration
    Beyond the realm of hearing—
    Except within my soul—
    There deathless dwelling ever.

    Always my ear
    Is yearning toward that cadence,
    Not for a theme of kindness
    Nor yet a rhythmic beauty—
    So many share of these—
    But for its truth and power.

    My inward ear
    In memory holds a semblance—
    Deluding consolation—
    But sentient ear, more human,
    Alert, will crave and wait
    And find contentment never.

  4. Parting of Three Friends

    by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott

    O, when shall we three meet again,
    In friendly converse true;
    O, when shall we three hold the chain
    Of a kind interview.

    Perhaps ere we again shall meet,
    Decrepid age may steal,
    Engraving marks of time most fleet,
    And set his potent seal.

    Perhaps we ne'er this side the grave,
    May press each friendly hand;
    But know the separating wave,
    Shall not our thoughts withstand.

    Still let us hope to meet again,
    And taste true friendship's balm;
    Our joys we then will not refrain,
    For pleasures new will charm.

  5. Sister's Grave

    by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott

    They are gone and have left me to weep,
    And I sigh as I wander the plain,
    To view the green turf where my two sisters sleep,
    And say,–when shall I meet them again?

    The rose bushes flourish to deck each dear grave,
    Commingling their dew drops with tearsl sustain,
    I sigh when I think there was nothing to save,
    And say, O my loves,—when shall we meet again?

    The balsam, the bower, still are blooming & green,
    Where at twilight I wander, some friend oftexclaims
    "Here cheerful Lucretia and Sarah were seen,
    But here never more shall we meet them again."

    The nightingale sings; but ah, knows not she wounds
    This heart so bereft of all joy but a name;
    Just to live, and to hope when the last trumpet sounds
    I may meet my dear sisters again.

  6. The Deserted Arbor

    by Eliza and Sarah Wolcott

    How fair are these branches, which once spread their shade
    For two lovely sisters, whom death low has laid;
    While the soft winding breeze sighs a slow passage through,
    And tells me my sisters have bid me adieu.

    I view these dear seats where they once fondly sat,
    I know this engraving, the muse points to that,
    I see their initials so dear to my view;
    But ah! my dear sisters have bid me adieu.

    The bower still is green as the season returns,
    The night bird approaches, and wildly she mourns,
    While lowly they sleep, and the echo is true
    That murmers, my sisters have bid me adieu.

    Then, O blessed Savior, look down from above,
    O teach me to pattern the friends whom I love,
    Their virtues and graces, O let me pursue,
    And then, O my sister, I'll rest beside you.

  7. To My Sister In Heaven

    But still, dear sister, though I often long
    To feel, to hear, to question and to see
    I know that you are sister none the less,
    And just as near and just as dear to me.

    - Edith Willis Linn
    A To My Sister In Heaven
    by Edith Willis Linn

    "Have you a sister?" strangers question me.
    I answer "No." But in my heart the while
    I hold the picture of a gentle face,
    A crown of golden curls, a heavenly smile.

    Dear sister! none the less my sister now
    Because I miss you in my earthly home,
    I cannot doubt that you are still to me
    All you had been, had Heaven not bid you come.

    Though you are pure from earthly stain and scar,
    Though you have grown to heights far, far above
    My loftiest dream; though angel, and most fair,
    You still must feel and own your sister-love.

    Death could not cheat me of that deep heart-joy.
    My hands have never lain in yours; my lips
    Have never rested on your face, my hair
    Has never felt your gentle finger-tips:

    But still, dear sister, though I often long
    To feel, to hear, to question and to see
    I know that you are sister none the less,
    And just as near and just as dear to me.

  8. You Never

    If Love alone could have saved you,
    You never would have died.

    - Anonymous
    You Never
    by Anonymous

    You never said I'm leaving.
    You never said goodbye.
    You were gone before I knew it,
    And only God knew why.
    A million times I needed you,
    A million times I cried.
    If Love alone could have saved you,
    You never would have died.
    In Life I loved you dearly,
    In death I love you still.
    In my heart you hold a place,
    That no one could ever fill.
    It broke my heart to lose you,
    But you didn't go alone.
    For part of me went with you,
    The day God took you home.

  9. Absence

    by Lucien V. Rule

    The western skies are starless now;
    No beauty's beacon sweet,
    When evening comes, smiles softly downbr /> Where happy lovers meet.

    Thus from the heavens of my heartbr /> I miss a tender light:
    For she my song, and hope, and cheer.br /> Is far from me to-night.

  10. Tired

    by Ella Wheeler Wilcox

    I am tired tonight, and something,
    The wind maybe, or the rain,
    Or the cry of a bird in the copse outside,
    Has brought back the past, and its pain.
    And I feel, as I sit here thinking,
    That the hand of a dead old June
    Has reached out hold of my heart's loose strings,
    And is drawing them up in tune.

    I am tired tonight, and I miss you,
    And long for you, love, through tears;
    And it seems but today that I saw you go—
    You, who have been gone for years.
    And I seem to be newly lonely—
    I, who am so much alone;
    And the strings of my heart are well in tune,
    But they have not the same old tone.

    I am tired; and that old sorrow
    Sweeps down the bed of my soul,
    As a turbulent river might suddenly break
    Away from a dam's control.
    It beareth a wreck on its bosom,
    A wreck with a snow-white sail,
    And the hand on my heart-strings thrums away,
    But they only respond with a wail.

  11. There is another sky

    by Emily Dickinson

    There is another sky,
    Ever serene and fair,
    And there is another sunshine,
    Though it be darkness there;
    Never mind faded forests, Austin,
    Never mind silent fields—
    Here is a little forest,
    Whose leaf is ever green;
    Here is a brighter garden,
    Where not a frost has been;
    In its unfading flowers
    I hear the bright bee hum:
    Prithee, my brother,
    Into my garden come!

  12. To Her

    by Charles Badger Clark

    Cut loose a hundred rivers,
    Roaring across my trail,
    Swift as the lightning quivers,
    Loud as a mountain gale.
    I build me a boat of slivers;
    I weave me a sail of fur,
    And ducks may founder and die
    But I
    Cross that river to her!

    Bunch the deserts together,
    Hang three suns in the vault;
    Scorch the lizards to leather,
    Strangle the springs with salt.
    I fly with a buzzard feather,
    I dig me wells with a spur,
    And snakes may famish and fry
    But I
    Cross that desert to her!

    Murder my sleep with revel;
    Make me ride through the bogs
    Knee to knee with the devil,
    Just ahead of the dogs.
    I harrow the Bad Lands level,
    I teach the tiger to purr,
    For saints may wallow and lie
    But I
    Go clean-hearted to her!

  13. Coming Home

    by Ellen P. Allerton

    Home to my mother's door. Push back the lock,
    She will not open it—no use to knock.
    A weight is on my breast; oh! never yet
    Daughter at mother's door such welcome met!

    No kiss upon my lips; no word, no sound,
    No loving arms reach out to clasp me round,
    I cross the threshold to a solemn room,
    Peopled with shadows, silent as the tomb.

    The heavy air is chill—no fire, no light;
    Only pale sunshine, streaming thin and white
    Through the bare panes upon the naked floor.
    I shrink and shiver—do not shut the door!

    Tread lightly on the creaking boards, speak low;
    Start not the hollow echoes; well I know
    They sleep in every corner. Do not call,
    Lest they should answer loudly, one and all.

    Her voice is still. 'Twas here I heard it last—
    Here by the door. The tears fell thick and fast
    From both our eyes; to-day the drops run o'er
    From only mine; and she—she weeps no more.

    This was her bed-room; it was here, you say,
    She laid in silence all that summer day,
    With roses (how she loved them!) at her head,
    Wreathed on the wall and strewn upon her bed.

    Now she lies yonder, and a sombre pall
    The dead leaves weave above her as they fall;
    The rains that beat, the autumn Winds that blow,
    Are making ready heavy shrouds of snow.

    Whatever covers her, she still sleeps well;
    But oh! these silent rooms! I can not tell
    Why their cold emptiness should move me so;
    I can not bear it longer—let us go.

  14. I Blow You a Kiss

    by William Stanley Braithwaite

    I blow you a kiss on the evening wind
    My dear, wherever you be;
    Up in the north or down in the south,
    Or over the rolling sea.

    I blow you a kiss, but after the kiss
    Do you know what follows, my dear?
    Something the wind cannot bring to you—
    Only a little tear.

  15. When You Go

    by Jessie Belle Rittenhouse

    When you go, a hush falls
    Over all my heart,
    And in a trance of my own dreams
    I move apart.

    When you go, the street grows
    Like a vacant place—
    What if a million faces pass
    If not your face?

    When you go, my life stops
    Like ships becalmed at sea,
    And waits the breath from heaven that blows
    You back to me.

  16. Alone

    by Ruby Archer

    For me the day is done,
    Though high the ardent sun;
    I feel the twilight gray.
    For you, my Love, are gone,
    My Sunlight and my Dawn,
    My Noon and all my Day.

  17. Boat-Song

    by Ruby Archer

    One thought comes ever hauntingly
    Across my path of day,
    Awaits not any summoning,
    Nor needs a prayer to stay;
    And if I flee, 'tis only that
    It ever may pursue.
    The thought, my love?—Is you.
    The thought is you.

    A haven beckons luringly,—
    A haven safe and wide,—
    My little bark of life to moor,
    And in its heart abide.
    How free my bark! No other shore
    Could tempt it from the blue.
    The haven, love?—Is you.
    The haven is you.

  18. Merchantmen

    by Ruby Archer

    Come in my ships, my letters,—
    Kind the sky above,—
    On your full sails faring
    From the harbor—love.

    Ye bring me wine for cargo;—
    Bear it safe, I pray,—
    Words,—a common vintage,
    Finer with delay.

  19. To Yesterday

    by Ruby Archer

    O Yesterday, you saw him. In your warm
    Sweet light we wandered idly, happily.
    Unto your deep of blue his eyes were lent,
    And through your moments lingered yet his voice.
    Bide near me, Yesterday. You know of him;
    And I may turn to you—now he is gone—
    Remind you of a glance, a word, a touch,
    A thousand glints of soul revealed to soul
    And thus defer the thought of poor To-day.

  20. Reunited Love Poems

  21. The Wall

    by Jessie Belle Rittenhouse

    Now we two are heart to heart,
    O most dear of all,
    Who were held so long apart
    By the sundering wall.

    But so suddenly it fell.
    At the final touch,
    We are dazed and cannot tell
    If we hope too much.

    We would wait to know the sum
    Of our joy and pain—
    But what if shadowy hands should come
    And build the wall again?

  22. The Home-Coming

    by Ruby Archer

    A porch, a hall, a stairway,
    Significant may be;
    I'm thinking what a Rubicon
    Your evening door, for me.

    On one side yearning, waiting,
    A thousand vague alarms,
    Tormenting worries women know;—
    The other side,—your arms!

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