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Poems For Girls

Table of Contents

  1. To the Cornflower by Annette Wynne
  2. The Lovable Child by Emilie Poulsson
  3. Jane and Eliza by Ann Taylor
  4. You Can Measure the Steeple by Annette Wynne

  1. To the Cornflower

    by Annette Wynne

    How smiling, how wondering, the cornflower's eyes,
    Looking at me joyously in flower-surprise,
    Glad as June's sunshine, bright as her skies.
    Let me have and hold you all the day through,
    Darling little comrade, blue as bluest blue,
    You're the sky's own sister, yet I can play with you;
    You're the sky's own sister, but you're better than a star,
    For you live right down here with me, and not so high and far.

  2. The Lovable Child

    by Emilie Poulsson

    Frisky as a lambkin,
    Busy as a bee—
    That's the kind of little girl
    People like to see.

    Modest as a violet,
    As a rosebud sweet—
    That's the kind of little girl
    People like to meet.

    Bright as is a diamond,
    Pure as any pearl—
    Everyone rejoices in
    Such a little girl.

    Happy as a robin,
    Gentle as a dove—
    That's the kind of little girl
    Everyone will love.

    Fly away and seek her,
    Little song of mine,
    For I choose that very girl
    As my Valentine.

  3. Jane and Eliza

    by Ann Taylor

    There were two little girls, neither handsome nor plain,
    One's name was Eliza, the other's was Jane;
    They were both of one height, as I've heard people say,
    And both of one age, I believe, to a day.

    'Twas fancied by some, who but slightly had seen them,
    There was not a pin to be chosen between them;
    But no one for long in this notion persisted,
    So great a distinction there really existed.

    Eliza knew well that she could not be pleasing,
    While fretting and fuming, while sulking or teasing;
    And therefore in company artfully tried,
    Not to break her bad habits, but only to hide.

    So, when she was out, with much labor and pain,
    She contrived to look almost as pleasant as Jane;
    But then you might see that, in forcing a smile,
    Her mouth was uneasy, and ached all the while.

    And in spite of her care it would sometimes befall
    That some cross event happened to ruin it all;
    And because it might chance that her share was the worst,
    Her temper broke loose, and her dimples dispersed.

    But Jane, who had nothing she wanted to hide,
    And therefore these troublesome arts never tried,
    Had none of the care and fatigue of concealing,
    But her face always showed what her bosom was feeling.

    At home or abroad there was peace in her smile,
    A cheerful good nature that needed no guile.
    And Eliza worked hard, but could never obtain
    The affection that freely was given to Jane.

  4. You Can Measure the Steeple

    by Annette Wynne

    You can measure the steeple that's close to the sky,
    You can burrow to where the gold grains lie,
    But a little girl's wonder is very big—
    Too high to climb and too deep to dig.