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Poems For Kids

Table of Contents

  1. A Boy's Song by James Hogg
  2. The Wind by Christina Rossetti
  3. "I'll Try" by Anonymous
  4. The Echoing Green by William Blake
  5. The Shepherd by William Blake
  6. The Lamb by William Blake
  7. My Shadow by Robert Louis Stevenson
  8. Were I the Sun by Anonymous
  9. A Good Boy by Robert Louis Stevenson
  10. The Children's King by Anonymous
  11. "I'll Stretch It a Little" by Anonymous

  1. A Boy's Song

    by James Hogg

    Where the pools are bright and deep,
    Where the gray trout lies asleep,
    Up the river and o'er the lea,
    That's the way for Billy and me.

    Where the blackbird sings the latest,
    Where the hawthorn blooms the sweetest,
    Where the nestlings chirp and flee,
    That's the way for Billy and me.

    Where the mowers mow the cleanest,
    Where the hay lies thick and greenest,
    There to trace the homeward bee,
    That's the way for Billy and me.

    Where the hazel bank is steepest,
    Where the shadow falls the deepest,
    Where the clustering nuts fall free.
    That's the way for Billy and me.

    Why the boys should drive away,
    Little sweet maidens from the play,
    Or love to banter and fight so well,
    That's the thing I never could tell.

    But this I know, I love to play,
    Through the meadow, among the hay;
    Up the water and o'er the lea,
    That's the way for Billy and me.

  2. The Wind

    by Christina Rossetti

    Who has seen the wind?
    Neither I nor you;
    But when the leaves hang trembling,
    The wind is passing through.

    Who has seen the wind?
    Neither you nor I;
    But when the trees bow down their heads,
    The wind is passing by.

  3. "I'll Try"

    by Anonymous

    "The others will laugh," said the Bugbear,
    "And ridicule you on the sly."
    "Never mind," said Jenny Endeavor,
    "I'll try."

    "You'll surely break down." said the Bugbear;
    "You know you are terribly shy."
    "Never mind," said Billy Endeavor,
    "I'll try."

    "It's really too hard," said the Bugbear;
    "You might as well venture to fly."
    "Never mind," said Susie Endeavor,
    "I'll try."

    "Just put the thing off," said the Bugbear.
    "And others the lack will supply."
    "I'll not," answered Tommy Endeavor,
    "I'll try."

  4. The Echoing Green

    by William Blake

    The Sun does arise,
    And make happy the skies;
    The merry bells ring
    To welcome the Spring;
    The skylark and thrush,
    The birds of the bush,
    Sing louder around
    To the bells’ cheerful sound,
    While our sports shall be seen
    On the Echoing Green.

    Old John, with white hair,
    Does laugh away care,
    Sitting under the oak,
    Among the old folk.
    They laugh at our play,
    And soon they all say:
    ‘Such, such were the joys
    When we all, girls & boys,
    In our youth time were seen
    On the echoing green.’

    Till the little ones, weary,
    No more can be merry;
    The sun does descend,
    And our sports have an end.
    Round the laps of their mothers
    Many sisters and brothers,
    Like birds in their nest,
    Are ready for rest,
    And sport no more seen
    On the darkening Green.

  5. The Shepherd

    by William Blake

    How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot!
    From the morn to the evening he strays;
    He shall follow his sheep all the day,
    And his tongue shall be filled with praise.

    For he hears the lamb's innocent call,
    And he hears the ewe's tender reply;
    He is watchful while they are in peace,
    For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.

  6. The Lamb

    by William Blake

    Little Lamb, who made thee?
    Dost thou know who made thee?
    Gave thee life & bid thee feed
    By the stream & o’er the mead;
    Gave thee clothing of delight,
    Softest clothing, wooly, bright;
    Gave thee such a tender voice,
    Making all the vales rejoice?
    Little Lamb, who made thee?
    Dost thou know who made thee?

    Little Lamb, I’ll tell thee,
    Little Lamb, I’ll tell thee:
    He is callèd by thy name,
    For he calls himself a Lamb.
    He is meek, & he is mild;
    He became a little child.
    I a child, & thou a lamb,
    We are callèd by his name.
    Little Lamb, God bless thee!
    Little Lamb, God bless thee!

  7. My Shadow

    by Robert Louis Stevenson

    I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me,
    And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.
    He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head;
    And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.

    The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow--
    Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow;
    For he sometimes shoots up taller like an india-rubber ball,
    And he sometimes gets so little that there's none of him at all.

    He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play,
    And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way.
    He stays so close beside me, he's a coward, you can see;
    I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me!

    One morning, very early, before the sun was up,
    I rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup;
    But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head,
    Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed.

  8. Were I the Sun

    by Anonymous

    I'd always shine on holidays
    Were I the sun;
    On sleepy heads I'd never gaze,
    But focus all my morning rays
    On busy folks of hustling ways,
    Were I the sun.

    I would not melt a sledding snow,
    Were I the sun;
    Nor spoil the ice where skaters go,
    Nor help those useless weeds to grow,
    But hurry melons on you know,
    Were I the sun.

    I'd warm the swimming pool just right,
    Were I the sun;
    On school-days I would hide my light.
    The Fourth I'd always give you bright,
    Nor set so soon on Christmas night,
    Were I the sun.

    I would not heed such paltry toys,
    Were I the sun--
    Such work as grown up men employs;
    But I would favor solld joys--
    In short I'd run the world for boys,
    Were I the sun!

  9. A Good Boy

    by Robert Louis Stevenson.

    I woke before the morning, I was happy all the day,
    I never said an ugly word, but smiled and stuck to play.

    And now at last the sun is going down behind the wood,
    And I am very happy, for I know that I've been good.

    My bed is waiting cool and fresh, with linen smooth and fair,
    And I must be off to sleepsin-by, and not forget my prayer.

    I know that, till to-morrow I shall see the sun arise,
    No ugly dream shall fright my mind, no ugly sight my eyes.

    But slumber hold me tightly till I waken in the dawn,
    And hear the thrushes singing in the lilacs round the lawn.

  10. The Children's King

    by Anonymous

    There once was a merry old monarch
    Who ruled in a frolicsome way.
    He cut up high Jinks with the children,
    And played with them all through the day.

    "A king always gets into trouble
    When trying to govern," he said.
    "So nothing but marbles and leap-frog
    And tennis shall hother my head."

    Ah, well! The wise people deposed him.
    "You may govern the children," said they.
    "Why, that is exactly what suits me,"
    He replied, and went on with his play.

    But it wasn't a year till the people
    All wanted the king back again;
    They had learned that a ruler of children
    Makes a pretty good ruler of men.

  11. "I'll Stretch It a Little"

    by Anonymous

    The wintry blast was fierce and cold,
    And the lassie's coat was thin and old.
    Her little brother by her side
    Shivered and pitifully cried.
    "Come underneath my coat," said she,
    "And see how snug and warm you'll be."
    The brother answered, nothing loth,
    "But is it big enough for both?"
    "Yes," said the girl, with cheery wit;
    "I'll stretch it out a little bit."

    Ah, brothers, sisters, where the mind
    Is bent upon an action kind,
    What though the means are sparely spun,
    And hardly seem to serve for one?
    Stretch them with love, and straightway you
    Will find them amply wide for two!