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Poems About Manners

Table of Contents

  1. Golden Keys by Anonymous
  2. Politeness by Elizabeth Turner
  3. Rules of Behavior by Anonymous
  4. Little Fred by Anonymous
  5. The Little Gentleman by Anonymous
  6. The Crust of Bread by Anonymous
  7. The Reformation of Godfrey Gore by William Brighty Rands
  8. Table Manners by Oliver Marble

  1. Golden Keys

    Hearts, like doors, oft ope with ease
    To very, very little keys,
    And don't forget that two are these:
    "I thank you, sir," and "If you please."

    – Anonymous
    Golden Keys
    by Anonymous

    A bunch of golden keys is mine
    To make each day with gladness shine.
    "Good morning" is the golden key
    That unlocks every door for me.

    When evening comes, "Good Night" I say,
    And close the door of each glad day.
    When at the table, "If You Please"
    I take from off my bunch of keys.

    When friends give anything to me
    I'll use the "Thank You" key,
    "Excuse me," "Beg your pardon, too,"
    When by mistake some harm I do,
    Or, if unkindly harm I've given,
    With "Forgive me," I shall be forgiven.

    On a golden ring these keys I'll bind,
    This is its motto—"Be ye kind."
    I'll often use each golden key,
    And then a child polite I'll be.

    Hearts, like doors, oft ope with ease
    To very, very little keys,
    And don't forget that two are these:
    "I thank you, sir," and "If you please."

  2. Politeness

    by Elizabeth Turner

    Good little boys should never say
    "I will," and "Give me these";
    O, no! that never is the way,
    But "Mother, if you please."

    And "If you please," to Sister Ann
    Good boys to say are ready;
    And, "Yes, sir," to a Gentleman,
    And, "Yes, ma'am," to a Lady.

  3. Rules of Behavior

    by Anonymous

    Hearts, like doors, will ope with ease
    To very, very little keys,
    And don't forget that two of these
    Are "I thank you" and "If you please."

    Come when you're called,
    Do what you're bid,
    Close the door after you,
    Never be chid.

    Seldom "can't,"
    Seldom "don't;"
    Never "shan't,"
    Never "won't."

  4. The Little Gentleman

    Be content with what is good:
    Seek in all things that you can
    To be a little gentleman.

    – Anonymous
    The Little Gentleman
    by Anonymous

    Take your meals, my little man,
    Always like a gentleman;
    Wash your face and hands with care,
    Change your shoes, and brush your hair;
    Then so fresh, and clean, and neat,
    Come and take your proper seat:
    Do not loiter and be late,
    Making other people wait;

    Do not rudely point or touch:
    Do not eat and drink too much:
    Finish what you have, before
    You even ask, or send for more:
    Never crumble or destroy
    Food that others might enjoy;
    They who idly crumbs will waste
    Often want a loaf to taste!
    Never spill your milk or tea,
    Never rude or noisy be;
    Never choose the daintiest food,
    Be content with what is good:
    Seek in all things that you can
    To be a little gentleman.

  5. Little Fred

    by Anonymous

    When little Fred
    Was called to bed,
    He always acted right;
    He kissed Mama,
    And then Papa,
    And wished them all good-night.

    He made no noise,
    Like naughty boys,
    But gently up the stairs
    Directly went,
    When he was sent,
    And always said his prayers.

  6. The Crust of Bread

    For wilful waste makes woeful want

    – Anonymous
    The Crust of Bread
    by Anonymous

    I must not throw upon the floor
    The crust I cannot eat;
    For many little hungry ones
    Would think it quite a treat.

    My parents labor very hard
    To get me wholesome food;
    Then I must never waste a bit
    That would do others good.

    For wilful waste makes woeful want,
    And I may live to say,
    Oh! how I wish I had the bread
    That once I threw away!

  7. The Reformation of Godfrey Gore

    by William Brighty Rands

    Godfrey Gordon Gustavus Gore—
    No doubt you have heard the name before—
    Was a boy who never would shut a door!

    The wind might whistle, the wind might roar,
    And teeth be aching and throats be sore,
    But still he never would shut the door.

    His father would beg, his mother implore,
    "Godfrey Gordon Gustavus Gore,
    We really do wish you would shut the door!"

    Their hands they wrung, their hair they tore;
    But Godfrey Gordon Gustavus Gore
    Was deaf as the buoy out at the Nore.

    When he walked forth the folks would roar,
    "Godfrey Gordon Gustavus Gore,
    Why don't you think to shut the door?"

    They rigged out a Shutter with sail and oar,
    And threatened to pack off Gustavus Gore
    On a voyage of penance to Singapore.

    But he begged for mercy, and said, "No more!
    Pray do not send me to Singapore
    On a Shutter, and then I will shut the door!"

    "You will?" said his parents; "then keep on shore!
    But mind you do! For the plague is sore
    Of a fellow that never will shut the door,
    Godfrey Gordon Gustavus Gore!"

  8. Table Manners

    by Oliver Marble

    When Teddy Bears are brought to table
    They do not clatter forks and knives;
    They act as well as they are able,
    And do so all their lives.

    They do not tip back in their chairs,
    Or leave the spoon within the cup,
    Or crook a finger for fine airs;
    They're very well brought up.

    They keep their mouths shut when they're chewing,
    Nor chew aloud, nor smack their lips;
    They're quite refined, whatever's doing—
    They drink not gulps, but sips.

    They speak when they are spoken to;
    Their elbows are not up, but down;
    They say, "Yes, please," and "I thank you,"
    As if they lived in town.

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